Batik Fabric

Batik Fabric is a pictorial Indonesian cloth that is made specifically by writing or applying wax to the cloth, then processing it in a certain way that has its own characteristics. Batik is an Indonesian technique of wax-resist dyeing applied to the whole cloth, or cloth made using this technique. Of Javanese origin, batik is made either by drawing dots and lines of the resist with a spouted tool called a canting, or by printing the resist with a copper stamp called a cap. The applied wax resists dyes and therefore allows the artisan to color selectively by soaking the cloth in one color, removing the wax with boiling water, and repeating if multiple colors are desired. A tradition of making batik is found in cultures such as Nigeria, China, India, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and most notably, Indonesia. Indonesian coastal batik made in the island of Java has a long history of acculturation, with diverse patterns influenced by a variety of cultures, and is the most developed in terms of pattern, technique, and the quality of workmanship. On October 2009, UNESCO designated Indonesian batik as a Masterpiece of Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. In the same year, UNESCO was also recognized "Education and training in Indonesian Batik intangible cultural heritage for elementary, junior, senior, vocational school and polytechnic students, in collaboration with the Batik Museum in Pekalongan" as Masterpiece of Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity in Register of Good Safeguarding Practices List. Batik is considered a cultural icon in modern Indonesia, where "National Batik Day" is celebrated annually on October 2, and many Indonesians continue to wear batik on a daily basis for casual and formal occasions.  


Batik Fabric is a pictorial Indonesian cloth that is made specifically by writing or applying wax to the cloth, then processing it in a certain way that has its own characteristics. Batik is an Indonesian technique of wax-resist dyeing applied to the whole cloth, or cloth made using this technique. Of Javanese origin, batik is made either by drawing dots and lines of the resist with a spouted tool called a canting, or by printing the resist with a copper stamp called a cap. The applied wax resists dyes and therefore allows the artisan to color selectively by soaking the cloth in one color, removing the wax with boiling water, and repeating if multiple colors are desired. A tradition of making batik is found in cultures such as Nigeria, China, India, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and most notably, Indonesia. Indonesian coastal batik made in the island of Java has a long history of acculturation, with diverse patterns influenced by a variety of cultures, and is the most developed in terms of pattern, technique, and the quality of workmanship. On October 2009, UNESCO designated Indonesian batik as a Masterpiece of Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. In the same year, UNESCO was also recognized "Education and training in Indonesian Batik intangible cultural heritage for elementary, junior, senior, vocational school and polytechnic students, in collaboration with the Batik Museum in Pekalongan" as Masterpiece of Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity in Register of Good Safeguarding Practices List. Batik is considered a cultural icon in modern Indonesia, where "National Batik Day" is celebrated annually on October 2, and many Indonesians continue to wear batik on a daily basis for casual and formal occasions.  

Color Depends on Request
Size 110x110 cm
Raw Material Mori cloth, Shantung cloth, Silk cloth
Capacity 600000 yard

Related Products